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English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
-destructive investigations in fbi history. this being, as far as we know one of the first mole hunts within the fbi agency. when did this happen? how did it come about? >> guest: well, it was the first mole hunt and it is in the current october of the sony and. i broke that story. i heard about it. it was very secret. the fbi still won't talk about it. but here's what happened, in 1962, a long time ago, a russian spy, kgb agent officer in new york city walked into the fbi building in manhattan and volunteered his services. he said he was discontent. his talents were being recognized. a familiar story when people come over and offer to work for the united states. the fbi people said well, what you're taking a big chance to walk into our building here on 69th street because you might have been seen, you know, some doubt no doubt some of your people and our building. he said no, our people are all up meeting at this moment with your guy. i was telling the fbi that the russians had a mole inside the fbi and the russians called him. well, the fbi immediately launched a mole hunt to try and find trans eyes. bec
inrticle the fbi. ands about -- mole hunt fbi. it is about 40 minutes. host: david wise is sitting with me. he has written several books about intelligence gathering. you have a story in the the recent addition of "smithsonian" magazine. set offt spy's tips one of the most self-destructive investigations in fbi history. when did this happen and how did it come about? guest: it is the first mole hunt. i broke that story. the fbi still will not talk about it. in 1962, a kgb agent in new york city walked into the fbi building in manhattan and volunteered his services. he said he was discontent and his talents were not being recognized. the fbi people said were to taking a big chance to walk into our building because you might have been seen? he said, no, i am not worried about it. our people are meeting with your guy, dick. uh-oh. that was telling the fbi that the russians had a mole inside the fbi and the russians called him dick. the fbi launched a mole hunt to try to find dick. because they did not know his real name, they called him an sub -- unsub, which stands for unknown subject. it t
2008. his 29-year career in the fbi included 11 years as a member of the u.s. government senior executive service. he directed the office of international operations which included officers at fbi headquarter in washington, d.c., and 76 legal offices in us embassy and consulate worldwide. he served as a member of the executive committee of inter poll. >> thank you. i would like to -- i guess amplify what spike talked about in term of organized crime and basically the evolution of the u.s. efforts to combat it. both domestically here and working throughout the world with other organizations to try to stop it. much has been made over the years that organized crime and terrorist groups were going to form a partnership that would be devastating to the united states, developed countries, and developing countries. what we have seen over the years it's not exactly worked out that for several reasons. in the areas where they cooperated a great deal they have expertise in explosive i have, creating fax travel documents, accessing the global financial networking, committing violence -- wh
booknotes. "the informant" is the count of the fbi and justice department collaboration with the high-level informant to collect information implicatiimplicati ng a large corporation. in this booknotes interview from 2000 author kurt eichenwald reveals how the scandal in the mid-1990s was complicated when the government discovered its source a senior executive at the firm was involved in his own illegal activity. this is the second part in a two-part series. you can watch the first part on line on booktv.org. c-span: kurt eichenwald, what is the brief synopsis of "the informant?" >> guest: "the informant" is about the highest-ranking corporate executive who ever worked as a cooperating witness with the fbi, who was producing evidence of an international price-fixing conspiracy at a company called archer daniels midland, on one level. on the second level, it's the story of how that individual, during the entire time he was working with the government and working as a senior officer at the company, was simultaneously losing his mind. and, ultimately, that sends the case spinning out of
addition of "smithsonian" magazine. "when the fbi spent decades hunting for a soviet spy on its staff." when did this happen, how did it come about? guest: it is the first mulholland. -- mole hunt. i broke that story. it was very secret. the fbi still will not talk about it. in 1962, a kgb agent in new york city walked into the fbi building in manhattan and volunteered his services. he said he was discontent and his talents were not being recognized. a familiar story. the fbi people said were to taking a big chance to walk into our building because you might have been seen? no doubt some of your people are looking into our building. he said, no, i am not worried about it. our people are meeting with your guy, dick. oh. that was telling the fbi that the russians had a mole inside the fbi and the russians called him dick. the fbi launched a mole hunt to try to find dick. because they did not know his real name, they called him an sub -- unsub, which stands for unknown subject. it turned the fbi upside down for a couple of decades. they are looking for this guy. host: the year that it al
" magazine. "when the fbi spent decades hunting for a soviet spy on its staff." when did this happen, how did it come about? guest: it is the first mulholland. hunt.e i broke that story. the fbi still will not talk about it. a kgb agent in new york city walked into the fbi building in manhattan and volunteered his services. he said he was discontent and his talents were not being recognized. said were toe taking a big chance to walk into our building because you might have been seen? no, i am not worried about it. our people are meeting with your guy, dick. that was telling the fbi that the russians had a mole inside the fbi and the russians called him dick. hunt tolaunched a mole try to find dick. because they did not know his real name, they called him an , which stands for unknown subject. upside downe fbi for a couple of decades. they are looking for this guy. host: the year that it all began? guest: 1962. was he ever caught? he or she? that's an interesting story. it was a he, as far as is known. was code-named fedora. as to whether or not he was telling the truth or trying to -- the bel
pacific aired mr. apuzzo, was the cia or fbi aware of najibullah zazi prior? >> guest: no, the intelligence of the n.y.p.d. had these huge programs designed to catch somebody like zazi. that infiltrated zazi's mosque and turned it into a cooperator. they had infiltrated one of his co-conspirators student groups. they had built files on all the restaurants in his neighborhood. they had been even to the ymca down the street wire zazi lived. he is well intended to catch somebody like this before they became a terrorist and they failed at every turn. meanwhile, this machine is generating huge amounts of information on innocent people appear to people talking on a coffee shop about what they thought about president bush's state of the union address. people are barbershop or address in traditional muslim attire that goes in a police file. where people watch soccer, where people watch cricket you end up with a huge amount of data. what we show if there is a process in place that did work and hopefully relieve americans with a sense, you know, of hope that a lot of what felt on 9/
no they weren't, he left them alone and he carried on going. the fbi are looking into this. they're inside terminal three right now, forensically going over the scene of the crime. this is how they describe what the investigation is ahead of them. >> at this point, we have the terminal shut down and we will have it shut down for a while, while we continue the investigation. the forensics teams are in there from both the fbi, as well as lapd. their work is long and methodical and they will take their time on this. >> and the suspect is still in hospital. no indications of just how bad his wounds are. the fbi want to speak to hip as soon as possible. as he's alive, they will know his true motive, if he is found guilty of this at some point. of course right now he's still just the suspect. back here to los angeles airport, 826 flights affected, 19,000 passengers affected not just here in los angeles but around the world because, remember, there were flights coming into los angeles that got turned around. the airport saying it could take two to three days before it's back to normal. just a sen
down. f.b.i. agents arrested the shooter at the hospital. his condition is still unclear. investigators say they found 100 more rounds of ammunition here at the scene. enough, they say, to kill everyone. in the area at the time. carter evans, cbs news, los angeles. >> pelley: so, why did this happen? our senior correspondent john miller is with us. he's the former head of counterterrorism for the lapd. john, what have you learned about the suspect? >> reporter: he is paul anthony ciancia. as carter said he's from new jersey but a lot doesn't emerge. what you don't see is the criminal record. you don't see other violent acts. what you don't see is references to him in the fbi files. yet what you do see today, according to investigators, is he walks into the terminal. he's got the gun in a garment bag. he takes the rifle out, he opens fire, shoots his way through the check point going down a side, coming around the back. he's focused on the tsa agents. inside the bag we are told investigators came up with notes saying that the tsa were facists and pigs, anti-american rantings, anti-tsa ra
sworn in at the fbi, ten-year term, top justice department official in the bush administration, took over for robert mueller, stepped down after 12 years the head of fbi. today president obama paid tribute to the new fbi director. >> i interviewed a number of extraordinary candidates for this job. all with sterling credentials. but what gave me confidence that this was the right man for the job wasn't his degrees and wasn't his resume, it was in talking to him and seeing his amazing family, a sense this is somebody who knows what's right and what's wrong. ♪ [ male announcer ] welcome back all the sweet things your family loves with 0-calorie monk fruit in the raw. ♪ welcome back [ male announcer ] it's made with the natural, vine-ripened sweetness of fruit, so you can serve up deliciously sweet treats without all the sugar. so let no drink go unsweetened. no spatula un-licked. and no last bit un-sipped. you don't have to throw a party, but you'll probably feel like celebrating. raw natural sweetness, raw natural success. you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec-d®. powe
more about the gunman. he still alive. the fbi says 23-year-old paul ciancia walked into the terminal and started shooting. he actually looked like he was targeting it sa agents. he would walk up to people and ask if he thrp tsa if they said no, he would let them go and leave the airport. when he was taken into custody evidently he had a handwritten note threatening the tsa. we now can see his pickerington. he is originally from new jersey. he evidently texted his brother saying he wanted to kill himself. while authorities look at that an yell. a neighbor who grew up with him in new jersey said he never saw this come. >> >> he was just a normal every day guy. friendly. evening right now i'm still trying to process about d. this really happen? did think get the wrong guy? if they told me they got the wrong guy that would make more sense to me. >> the fbi says they got the right guy at this point. the shooting disrupted air travel all day yesterday not only at lax but all across the country. if you are either flying into lax or out of lax you might want to check your airline to make sur
of the country. what is your reaction to administration position a criminal investigation by the fbi about what is an an tax on an attack on country, which falls in pervue of intelligence agencies and military would be reason to block effort understand better what transpired. lou: it makes no sense. >> we should be ale coconduct a criminal investigation, representatives of people to find out what happened, whether a consulate was burned to ground, ambassador killed and cia driven out, that is serious business, they do not have to have an open hearing, they can do a closed-door hearing to get at the issues with the witnesses that i want to call. and certainly, the government should not be attempting to control those witnesses, and still protect the criminal justice system. by the way, lou, that criminal justice -- investigation on criminal justice side got off on the wrong foot, the next day, we may not have been able to get troops in that night, we could have got troops in the next day, we should have secured consulate, put our flag back up and brought the fbi in to begin an immediate investig
called in the fbi to assist his office in the investigation and to get answers to several basic questions in the teen's january death. >> first, what was the cause of mr. johnson's death? second, was mr. johnson's death the result of a crime? third, if mr. johnson's death was the result of a crime, who committed that crime? >> reporter: kendrick's parents never believed the local sheriffs explanation kendrick suffocated after squeezing his 19-inch shoulders into the 14-inch opening of a gym mat to reach his shoe in the middle of a school day. they spoke with wolf blitzer moments after the announcement. >> i believe indeed that he was murdered. >> do you have any idea who may have murdered him? >> no, i don't. that's what we want to get down to the truth sq. >> the only question we want to know is why are they covering up for who killed their son. >> reporter: it made the johnsons suspicious, including why these shoes found yards from kendrick's body were not collected as evidence and how this bloodstain ended up on the whole wal and why they never found whose blood it was and the state's
, standing by live at the airport is dominick. >> reporter: uma, the fbi is looking into the background of paul ciancia, they believe is the gunman. that's how they identified him yesterday. they're also searching his apartment which is just east of hollywood here. they believe that after messages he stoent his family that his intent was to harm tsa agents and as he went through the airport yesterday, that is what he appeared to exactly be targeting. the los angeles times is pointing out, quoting officials saying that's what the tsa firmly believes and we're hearing via local radio from passengers who say that as he went to the airport, he was asking individuals if they were tsa and they were saying no and he was moving on looking as it appears for officials. we also looking into -- rather, the fbi is looking into just what exactly his motivation could have been. they're looking at whether he had an issue or run-in at a tsa checkpoint at an airport at some point in the past. they're looking if he may have been a job applicant who was turned down and the police officer was telling me yes
. now the fbi will reopen the investigation. [ male announcer ] pepcid® presents: the burns family dinner. why would i take one pepcid® when i could take tums® throughout the day when my heartburn comes back? 'cause you only have to take one... [ male announcer ] don't be like the burns. just one pepcid® complete works fast and lasts. smoke? nah, i'm good. [ male announcer ] celebrate every win with nicoderm cq, the unique patch with time release smartcontrol technology that helps prevent the urge to smoke all day long. help prevent your cravings with nicoderm cq. >>> there is hope the family of georgia teenager kendrick johnson will find justice. the fbi will look at their son's death with fresh eyes. cnn aggressively pursued answers in johnson's death after authorities ruled he died accidentally even though some parts of their investigation didn't add up. cnn's victor blackwell is on the case. >> no justice! >> no peace! >> reporter: after months of rallies and protests the family hopes they will get justice. >> at this time however i am of the opinion a sufficient basis exist
the fbi wants to look into his background. they want to see precisely what the motivation was. i was speaking to a police officer yesterday. the police often certain was telling me, look, he might have had a run-in at some point at a checkpoint with the tsa at an airport, we don't know. there was also speculation from the officer that perhaps he'd actually applied for a job that he didn't get with the tsa and possibly that he tried signing up for the precheck, which is early security screening, and might have been turned down for that. that was speculation very much at the time. the fbi is searching his apartment today. it is unclear at this time if anything they found at all. but local officials saying that this actually could have been an awful lot worse and the tsa was so swift to react when the gunman actually entered the airport. take a listen. >> we bore witness to heroism at this airport. when shots rang out, members of the police department ran towards that gunfire, without regard to their own safety or well being. they tracked down the suspect, apprehended and arrested h
is references to him in the fbi files. yet what you do see today, according to investigators, is he walks into the terminal. he's got the gun in a garment bag. he takes the rifle out o he opens fire, shoots his way through the check point going down a side, coming around the back. he's focused on the tsa agents. inside the bag we are told investigators came up with notes saying that the tsa were facists and pigs, anti-american rantings, anti-tsa rantings am and references to the new world order which is another growing conspiracy group that believes the world is going to be taken over by forces and black helicopters and so on. interestingly, scott, today he texted his parents from l.a. to new jersey and said he was going to kill himself today. they called the police. there was a response to his house. apparently they didn't make contact with him but a roommate who didn't know where he was. so this was something that was roiling in his head today. >> pelley: john, thank you very much. there are big security concerns also in new york city because there will be two million spectators for the
with the fbi that the gunman is named paul anthony ciancia. they have confirmed it, he's 23 years old. his last known address was here in los angeles in the los feliz area, and this morning, they believe, the suspect, 9:20, opened terminal three here at l.a.x. and opened fire. there are several victims. one has died, a tsa agent, and the gunman is injured as well. i'm going to have my photographer swing to the right. people from terminal three are finally being let out. there are a couple thousand people who were in there and stranded in a safe room. some are walking by right as we're speaking at this moment. now, we did hear from some witnesses who did get out earlier today. and when they came out, they were talking about all sorts of different things happening inside, people running, hitting the ground in fear. hiding behind counters in restaurants. running down pathway s onto planes and onto the tarmac. listen to what one witness who saw what happened, what he said when the gunman walked in and opened fire. >> when the first shot came, there was loud screaming and people running. a group of
to the fbi so they can follow up on it. missouri,o jerry from a republican caller. caller: good morning. excuse my speech. go ahead with your comment. caller: i am opposed to spying on americans. i just think it is wrong. i don't think there is any good in it, i don't think there is anything that will come out of it -- out of it. garrison new hampshire, republican caller. new hampshire, republican caller. i am opposed to the nsa spying. they should be ashamed of themselves. the department of homeland security, the nsa, they should all be removed. congress gave away our right after 9/11. they gave their rights away to the president. that is our voice, our rights. they need to take that back and rain and the nsa and the government. they are going crazy. john is next, a republican from louisiana. a lot of the nsa spying is due to the technology. it used to be a scanner is all you had. now it is on a global magnitude. what are they intended to target somebody, i believe that comes under the fisa court. to fact they listen something is basically because they can. it would be physically impos
the number of times that it looks at this data, how often these queries in the data result in fbi investigations, for instance. and also to have the court that oversees all of this perhaps have a third party lawyer, someone from outside who can provide some advice that perhaps doesn't come from the government as a way to sort of balance the interests of privacy in these issues. now, all of this is looking at changes on the domestic part of this thing. what secretary kerry was talking about is sort of the international collection by the nsa. and that's not really going to change much under this bill. >> yeah, and i'll jump in there. dealing with criticism of course, the obama administration from overseas about spying on friends in particular the german chancellor angela merkel, when we're looking at the domestic angle, are they going to look at that, as well? >> well, michael, the white house has said they're taking a look. they're going to review all of these programs and to see what they need to do, whether or not what the nsa is doing is necessary versus what they're doing just
to work with interrogations. there are very good professional groups. the fbi is excellent. they have people that that is all they do. they do that all the time. they have great experience and they know how to conduct interrogations. but you don't bring practitioners, people who treat patients into this arena, particularly since more often than not they're young doctors, just out of training. and it's not at all up to that point what they have had as part of their experience. >> walt, your answer. >> well, i think if the problem is that they are not that experienced, then perhaps we should be looking or the military should be looking for more experienced practitioners to be part of this. but i think in terms of the overall use of medical professionals, certainly there's nothing legally problematic with that. whether there is an ethical problem for the medical profession is something obviously the medical professions is going to need to wrestle with. >> is this about the policies, is this about the medical practice or is this about the policies of the u.s. government and intelligence.
of the five 9/11 defendants stopped, the fbi sent in a so-called "clean team" to question them all over again, but without coercion. and those statements are admissible. >> bormann: it's like alice going down the rabbit hole, right? you torture him for three years. you keep him in captivity after you stop torturing him in a place like guantanamo bay. and then, you send in agents from the same government that tortured him for three years to take statements. and then, if you're general martins, you say, "well, those are now clean." guess what. they're not. >> martins: i understand, i understand the argument. the people do not forfeit their chance for accountability because someone may have crossed a line or have coerced or subjected to harsh measures somebody who is in custody. >> stahl: so you're saying that it's unfair to the justice system not to be able to question these guys later. >> martins: the point that i reject and that the law rejects is that there can be no voluntary statements following an instance of coercion. justice requires that you look deeper, that you determine if the state
with nsa officials? is no set schedule, but they are often up there, the fbi, cia, with pieces related to intelligence gathering. we have got all the other afro -- alphabet soup agencies coming to our committee from time to time to talk about what is happening. host: have you ever attended a pfizer court seizure? >> that is not allowed. why not let an intelligence member in? guest: i do not know. was the case, giving the close hold they have on the process. one of the things we're looking at is how do we open up those court operations without revealing sources, methods, giving away trade secrets, so to speak, getting more visibility and transparency into that process. do someoing to have to things to regain the trust of the american people and it may well mean that we have to open up some issues that you would rather not. issues that we really should not or would not otherwise have done , trying to reestablish some sense of confidence in the american people that we are not spying on each other or gathering e-mails from twitter and facebook. all the stuff the newspaper is reporting with
longer. police and the fbi have questioned members of his family in new jersey. ciancia's father tells us he talked to him last week complaining of the economy and not having a job and a roommate in los angeles says all of this comes as a shock. >> never had anger or anything in him. when he was here, nothing. i didn't have any issues with him or anything. he was a really nice job. -- nice guy. a bit loner, introverted but nothing i would ever expect him to do something like this. >> reporter: both state and local official say they have no record of any trouble from before paul ciancia and at a loss to explain this morning why a 23-year-old who apparently didn't fly much would be so angry at the tsa. erica, lester? >> one of the many questions. pete williams, thank you. >>> william bratton was the chief of police in los angeles for seven years until 2009. good morning. not it diminish their role, but tsa are not police officers and not armed guards. anyone to prevent someone from getting through the checkpoints? >> the tsa agents are, in fact, unarmed and you rely largely on airport polic
. it terminal three is closed as the f.b.i. investigates the deadly shooting of a tsa agent. >> halloween just wrapped up. stores are moving on to the next holiday. the reason stores need to get a jump on the shopping season. 0!ockÑ?çóxo?Ñ=çñÑñçvxqx?ñññ?óioy [ will ] power. precision. elegance. sometimes, the luxurious things in life are... hey! what are you doing? get outta here! get outta here, you dumb dancers! i've told them 100 times they can't dance in here. bunch of dirty dancers. there's nothing that gets me more ticked off is a bunch of dirty, irresponsible dancers, dancin in front of my dodge durango. ♪ . >>> good morning to you. a live look at the mostly gray sky over the oakland estuary. in oakland right now 52 degrees. >>> continuinging coverage on the lax shooting, from new jersey to los angeles, the search is underway for a motive behind the deadly attack. the suspected gunman, 23 dwreerd paul 23-year-old paul anthony ciancia, had sent a text to his family in new jersey early yesterday telling him he was thinking about taking his life. we're live at lax as that ai
as anybody over at the cia or fbi or wherever it is. they could produce -- >> they argue that -- i'll run it by you, see what you think. the argumentati i've heard is te are some of the sensitive people who work for the cia or other intelligence agencies and if they start testifying either in open or closed door session, before congress, they have to retire. they, for all practical purposes, can no longer be clandestine officers of the united states. >> my understanding is awhile ago, the national counterterrorism center actually was the lead agency in putting together the definitive timeline for the administration on what happened in benghazi. they went in in closed session, the director of the nctc in the intelligence committee, took the whole intelligence committee through the timeline with video surveillance video and the whole thing and after that, there were folks on the intelligence committee, republicans, saying okay, benghazi is a little different than we were thinking and some of the heat turned down. i don't know if lindsey graham has asked to see that presentation, but other r
at the fbi, cia, u.s. customs service. the list of prior recipients is in your program and i think you will agree it is an impressive roster of great americans. tonight, as you heard, we honor leon panetta, who has given much of his life to public service and has left an indelible mark in the fight against terrorism and extremism. history will probably remember him as the director of the central intelligence agency who launched a successful operation to bring osama bin laden to justice. as secretary of defense, he kept his commitment to keep america strong while working to end america's involvement in iraq and transition and exit from afghanistan. under his stewardship, cooperation between the united states and israel to face, and challenges, defense it grew to it on presented at -- unprecedented level. leon panetta has been there reaching out to consult with israel on terrorist threats and to ensure israel's military superiority. proud that hisly early fact-finding trips to mission inin adl together with some legislators who went on to assume pivotal leadership roles. if you look clos
rolled up in a wrestling mat at his high school gym. now, this inquiry by the fbi and federal prosecutors is a huge victory for the teen's family who have argued all along their son was murdered. >> we got to fight for him. if we don't fight, no one will. >> we want justice. we're not stopping until we get justice. >> karen desoto is a defense attorney and former prosecutor. welcome to you. what kind of evidence do federal investigators have to open this informati investigation? >> well, they have the autopsy report from the forensics that was done by the parents. they had the body exhumed. >> a second one? >> a second one, right. they felt confident their son was murdered and have been fighting all along. they got the body exhumed, came up, they did the autopsy, and sure enough, even though there's some bizarre facts about the body being stuffed with newspaper, and that's another controversy, but according to that doctor, it was blunt trauma. >> okay. blunt trauma, as i understand it, to the right side of his neck. put that with the first report that was the straight autopsy in which it
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)